HISTORY - Page 5

These Air Force announcements fostered a wave of activity on the part of the Army, especially with regard to the 1,000-mile missile. To Army, depending on the use of the 120,000-pound thrust NAA engine, its facilities appeared to be the logical site for development. It was felt that the REDSTONE could be upgraded to a two-stage missile having a range of 1,000 miles or better. Besides, the guidance system was being developed, and much of the hardware required for such a weapon had already been proven. Personnel and facilities at Redstone Arsenal could admirably satisfy the requirement, and OCO proposed that these be offered 6 . The 1,500-Mile Missile The thinking in terms of range did not stop with the idea of the 1,000-mile missile, for on 14 February 1955 the Technological Capabilities Panel, commonly known as the Killian Committee, recommended an immediate program leading to the development of small artificial satellites and an IRBM of the 1,500-mile range class to parallel ICBM development. Missiles of such range actively affected the concept of waging warfare and, in this respect, the Army Deputy Chief, Research and Development (R&D), queried OCO as to the possibility of a 1,000 to 1,500 mile missile. There were a number of matters to be considered. For example, according to the R&D chief, airlifted assaults over great distances might characterize Army operations, and the transport of such weapons as the REDSTONE and SERGEANT to airheads might pose a serious logistic problem. Therefore, the launching of a long-range ballistic missile from a relatively rear area might prove quite effective as well as economical. Before such a concept was adopted, however, there ______________________________
6. DA Pam 70-10, p. 118; House Rpt Nr 67, 87th Congress, 1st Session, subj: A Chronology of Missile and Astronautic Events, Washington, D.C., 1961; Emme, Eugene M., Aeronautics and Astronautics, NASA, 1961.
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These Air Force announcements fostered a wave of activity on the part of the Army, especially with regard to the 1,000-mile missile. To Army, depending on the use of the 120,000-pound thrust NAA engine, its facilities appeared to be the logical site for development. It was felt that the REDSTONE could be upgraded to a two-stage missile having a range of 1,000 miles or better. Besides, the guidance system was being developed, and much of the hardware required for such a weapon had already been proven. Personnel and facilities at Redstone Arsenal could admirably satisfy the requirement, and OCO proposed that these be offered 6 . The 1,500-Mile Missile The thinking in terms of range did not stop with the idea of the 1,000-mile missile, for on 14 February 1955 the Technological Capabilities Panel, commonly known as the Killian Committee, recommended an immediate program leading to the development of small artificial satellites and an IRBM of the 1,500-mile range class to parallel ICBM development. Missiles of such range actively affected the concept of waging warfare and, in this respect, the Army Deputy Chief, Research and Development (R&D), queried OCO as to the possibility of a 1,000 to 1,500 mile missile. There were a number of matters to be considered. For example, according to the R&D chief, airlifted assaults over great distances might characterize Army operations, and the transport of such weapons as the REDSTONE and SERGEANT to airheads might pose a serious logistic problem. Therefore, the launching of a long-range ballistic missile from a relatively rear area might prove quite effective as well as economical. Before such a concept was adopted, however, there ______________________________

HISTORY - Page 5

6. DA Pam 70-10, p. 118; House Rpt Nr 67, 87th Congress, 1st Session, subj: A Chronology of Missile and Astronautic Events, Washington, D.C., 1961; Emme, Eugene M., Aeronautics and Astronautics, NASA, 1961.
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