Working On Site
6-01: The missile, having been transported to the site, is backed up to the launch pedestal. A launch pedestal ring is attached to the missile’s base. The back side of the pedestal ring is hinged to the launch platform. The "A" frame routes hoisting cables which pull the missile into an erect position. As the missile’s erection reaches a critical point a hydraulic post known as a "snubber" is connected to the top-side of the missile’s pedestal ring to ease the missile into its upright position. Don't want that missile tipping over as it approaches its vertical state! Notice the gold foil surrounding the thrust chamber? It's designed to ward off heat, etc. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide02)
6-02: The Jupiter is about half way to its normal vertical “launch” configuration. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide05)
Placing a Snubber to Control Jupiter Rate of Erection Placing a Snubber to Control Jupiter Rate of Erection
6-04: The group supervisor (Mr. Snyder (sp?)) connects the "snubber" to the missile pedestal ring’s receptacle as the missile gets close to its vertical position. The snubber is a hydraulic piston assembly which slowly lets the missile down to its upright state, preventing the missile from tumbling over. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide06)
6-05: Waiting for the signal from the supervisor that the snubber is attached to the base of the missile. That's George Smith in the white jacket gawking around, with Kline on the right. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961 Slide08)
The Jupiter Has Almost Reached Its Vertical Erection Configuration The Jupiter Has Almost Reached Its Vertical Erection Configuration
6-06: With the snubber attached, the missile very slowly continues on its path to obtaining vertical configuration. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide09)
6-07: The Jupiter is almost in its vertical state at this point. You can see the cables pulling the missile to its upright position. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide04)
The Jupiter Has Reached Its Vertical Configuration. The Jupiter Has Reached Its Vertical Configuration.
6-08: The Jupiter has reached its vertical configuration. Erection equipment can now be disassembled and removed from the area. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide10)
Cables Slack, Upright Launch Configuration Checked Cables Slack, Upright Launch Configuration Checked
6-09: Cables slack, results being checked. Jupiter is in its upright launch configuration. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide11)
6-10: An erect Jupiter, cables slack, final operational configuration. Aimed at the sky and ready to go...after the guidance package gets tweaked and the warhead gets attached…which would happen after the site is turned over to the Air Force. The “Ibrahim II” art work was provided by Ed May at the Chrysler Corporation Missile Division plant located in Sterling Heights, Warren, Michigan, and only applied after the Jupiter’s arrival in Turkey in part to conceal its final destination during transport from Michigan to Turkey. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide13)
A Rocketdyne tech monitors Jupiter engine during erection. A Rocketdyne tech monitors Jupiter engine during erection.
6-03: Rocketdyne, an American rocket engine design and production company, was founded by North American Aviation in 1955. Rocketdyne supplied their engines as propulsion units for the Jupiter missiles. A Rocketdyne tech monitors a Jupiter missile’s engine during its erection process on LP-3. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide01)
Cables Pulling Jupiter to Its Upright Position Cables Pulling Jupiter to Its Upright Position
Page 5 Page 5 Page 7 Page 7 Elevating the Jupiter missile to Its Upright Launch Position Elevating the Jupiter missile to Its Upright Launch Position
The Jupiter Erected Half-way to Its Vertical Position The Jupiter Erected Half-way to Its Vertical Position
Smith & Kline Observing Jupiter Erection (LP-3) Smith & Kline Observing Jupiter Erection (LP-3)
Jupiter in Its Final Operational Orientation Jupiter in Its Final Operational Orientation

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Working On Site
Placing a Snubber to Control Jupiter Rate of Erection Placing a Snubber to Control Jupiter Rate of Erection
The Jupiter Has Almost Reached Its Vertical Erection Configuration The Jupiter Has Almost Reached Its Vertical Erection Configuration
A Rocketdyne tech monitors Jupiter engine during erection. A Rocketdyne tech monitors Jupiter engine during erection.
Elevating the Jupiter missile to Its Upright Launch Position Elevating the Jupiter missile to Its Upright Launch Position
The Jupiter Erected Half-way to Its Vertical Position The Jupiter Erected Half-way to Its Vertical Position
Smith & Kline Observing Jupiter Erection (LP-3) Smith & Kline Observing Jupiter Erection (LP-3)
The Jupiter Has Reached Its Vertical Configuration. The Jupiter Has Reached Its Vertical Configuration.
Cables Slack, Upright Launch Configuration Checked Cables Slack, Upright Launch Configuration Checked
Cables Pulling Jupiter to Its Upright Position Cables Pulling Jupiter to Its Upright Position
Jupiter in Its Final Operational Orientation Jupiter in Its Final Operational Orientation Jupiter in Its Final Operational Orientation
6-01: The missile, having been transported to the site, is backed up to the launch pedestal. A launch pedestal ring is attached to the missile’s base. The back side of the pedestal ring is hinged to the launch platform. The "A" frame routes hoisting cables which pull the missile into an erect position. As the missile’s erection reaches a critical point a hydraulic post known as a "snubber" is connected to the top-side of the missile’s pedestal ring to ease the missile into its upright position. Don't want that missile tipping over as it approaches its vertical state! Notice the gold foil surrounding the thrust chamber? It's designed to ward off heat, etc. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide02)
6-02: The Jupiter is about half way to its normal vertical “launch” configuration. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide05)
6-04: The group supervisor (Mr. Snyder (sp?)) connects the "snubber" to the missile pedestal ring’s receptacle as the missile gets close to its vertical position. The snubber is a hydraulic piston assembly which slowly lets the missile down to its upright state, preventing the missile from tumbling over. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide06)
6-05: Waiting for the signal from the supervisor that the snubber is attached to the base of the missile. That's George Smith in the white jacket gawking around, with Kline on the right. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961 Slide08)
6-06: With the snubber attached, the missile very slowly continues on its path to obtaining vertical configuration. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide09)
6-07: The Jupiter is almost in its vertical state at this point. You can see the cables pulling the missile to its upright position. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide04)
6-08: The Jupiter has reached its vertical configuration. Erection equipment can now be disassembled and removed from the area. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide10)
6-09: Cables slack, results being checked. Jupiter is in its upright launch configuration. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide11)
6-10: An erect Jupiter, cables slack, final operational configuration. Aimed at the sky and ready to go...after the guidance package gets tweaked and the warhead gets attached…which would happen after the site is turned over to the Air Force. The “Ibrahim II” art work was provided by Ed May at the Chrysler Corporation Missile Division plant located in Sterling Heights, Warren, Michigan, and only applied after the Jupiter’s arrival in Turkey in part to conceal its final destination during transport from Michigan to Turkey. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide13)
6-03: Rocketdyne, an American rocket engine design and production company, was founded by North American Aviation in 1955. Rocketdyne supplied their engines as propulsion units for the Jupiter missiles. A Rocketdyne tech monitors a Jupiter missile’s engine during its erection process on LP-3. (GSmith, Dev Date: Oct 1961, Slide01)
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